Arithmetic Problem #7

I came across this interesting algebra/ arithmetic problem the other day.

(1 \times 2 \times 3) + 2 = 8 = 2^3
(2 \times 3 \times 4) + 3 = 27 = 3^3
(3 \times 4 \times 5) + 4 = 64 = 4^3

Do you think this will always work?

Hint: We can use algebra to prove this cool sequence easily.

Arithmetic Problem #7
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